5th Wheel Trailers are considered in general to be the upper end of the travel trailer class of RVs. They are specifically designed to be pulled by pickup trucks with a special hitch in the truck’s bed. There are certainly budget models that are lower priced vs some of the luxury hitch towed units. A big advantage of 5th Wheel units is the extra space gained over the truck’s bed. The unit could be the same trailer length as a hitch mount, but the overall combined truck and trailer will be less making it a little easier to tow.

Another advantage of 5th wheels over hitch towed is weight distribution. As the 5th’s wheel’s hitch is over the rear axle, you have more even weight distribution to the front tires to help maintain steering while also putting weight on the rear tires for traction. A 5th Wheel trailer can still be subject heavy cross winds, even more depending on the height. As such when driving in heavy winds and storms, if you are not comfortable – please pull off the road and stop.

Like many hitch towed travel trailers, 5th Wheel trailers often contain one or more slide outs plus roll up/roll down shade awnings. These features increase the comfort and versatility when you set up camp. Just be certain when you select or are assigned a parking spot at a campground/resort, there is sufficient clearance for slide outs and the awnings.

Next up for major consideration are Wide Mirrors. Travel trailers are normally much wider then the towing truck or SUV. As a result, if you thought there was blind spots in your mirrors before, you have a whole new experience towing a travel trailer to enjoy. Some trucks and SUVs have built in push out mirrors to solve the problem of being able to see around the trailer. Most don’t. There are adapter kits that are universal and others that are for Ford, GMC and Dodge specifically. If a friend offers to loan you his, check if they will fit. If you are buying a used one and the mirrors are included, again check if they are even usable on your unit.

Some examples to give you ideas for when you are shopping online or at an RV supply store.

Back up cameras take on a whole new meaning and value when dealing with a travel trailer, especially a longer one, greater than 25 feet. There is a natural blind spot behind the trailer that grows in size substantially as the trailer grows in length. And if you think people like to tailgate cars, they are 10 times worse with trailers. No matter how fast you may be going, they will you are holding you them up and they will get right up behind the trailer and jump out and back in looking for a time to pass. Even on a 4 or more lane highway, they will still play their games. While the back up camera will be useful when maneuvering in the campground or parking when you get back home, it will mostly be useful just driving down the road.

When looking at purchasing a back up camera for a travel trailer, realize that the standard $40-$50 ones for sale will not work. You will need one most likely with an extra long cable – or the ability to add more cables for length – or a wireless unit. Below are a few yo can check for ideas on what to purchase when the time comes.

I am also including some books to consider reading before buying your first travel trailer. If you already have one, or maybe are buying one from a friend/neighbor/coworker, you might consider some of the information to assist you in transitioning – even for vacations only – from a home to travel trailer. If you are considering retiring and living nearly full time in a travel trailer, this information could be even more important to you.

A close up short of the kingpin on the trailer.

A hitch to be installed in the truck bed.

These are some sample pictures of many different units. As you can see, they can stylish, luxurious and with home like amenities.

Pictures below are provided by contributors or supporters of this website. If you are interested in sharing your pictures of Nevada, please drop us a note.


Courtesy S. Ward – Lonely highways and byways